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Reap the Benefits of Moving Your Body More Every Day.

Reap the Benefits of Moving Your Body More Every Day.

Let’s get moving.

Many people make a living being sedentary. It’s not something we should be ashamed of, just something that has become ingrained in our culture. Activity, in the past, was built into a typical workday. As our society has changed, the activity that was once a part of daily life has been replaced with sedentary jobs requiring little to no physical activity.

What we know about daily activity.

In a recent article in the Annals of Medicine, it is suggested that being sedentary is detrimental to our health. Not good news for the average adult who is sedentary 12.3 hours every day during waking hours! Our health depends on us spending a large part of our day moving! 8 hours a day at a desk-bound job can harm our health. The good news is there are simple solutions!

Add Activity to Your Work Day

Proactive solutions.
WALK WITH ME. Popular culture may be trying to make things easier, so make the real goal of taking little steps toward making your health a priority.  Incorporate a minute of walking time when you need to retrieve copies. Say “walk with me” when a coworker wants to discuss something. Take a lap around the office or the block while you talk.
SIT SMARTER.  A great start is shifting the way we spend our days at the office and modify how we design our workspaces.  Office equipment and furniture should have the goal of limiting the total time you are sedentary, which is crucial to improving our health.  Furniture that allows and encourages you to move throughout the day is called active sitting and has substantial health benefits.
USE TECHNOLOGY. There are also tools to incorporate more movement into your day, like wearable technology to track caloric burn and steps, as well as alarms that remind you to get up and move.  It’s an easy fix if you are sitting at your computer to set a little alarm as a reminder!

Great news.  Making small changes with significant health benefits has never been easier.  You can easily make improvements to your health. Just increase your active time 2-4 hours a day with just a few of the solutions above.

For more information about incorporating movement into your workday, visit www.myofficemoves.com or email me at stevyn.guinnip@fflbrands.com.

 

Explosive Brilliance in the Billions

Explosive Brilliance in the Billions

Explosive Brilliance in the Billions

Taylor is a brilliant chief investment officer at Axe Capital, and is usually is the smartest person in the room. So when the Variable balans appears in frame with Taylor getting some of her head together in the Axe Capital mediation room – you know it’s a smart move.

The Variable balans chair has made several appearances in Season 3, and will continue to be seen through the series, so keep an eye out and see if you spot it. Dealing with the stress of managing billions of investor dollars as well as the SEC, it is easy to see why the Variable is such a good choice for Axe Capital. But really, you don’t need to have that much stress in your life to appreciate the benefits of the Variable

Once you’ve sat on a Variable balans, you’ll never want to go back to your old way of sitting.
The iconic design gently tilts the pelvis forward and encourages a natural, dynamic, and upright spine. The muscles in the abdomen and back engage to keep the spine straight and the body balanced, strengthening core muscles and preventing back and shoulder tension. It also improves circulation, boosts energy levels and helps increase concentration.

Ready to add the Variable balans to your meditation room, office or home? Created over 35 years ago it’s as timeless as it is stylish, and ergonomically precise. Varier has committed to a healthy lifestyle for our customers and our planet. Revive, one of our newest fabrics, is responsibly manufactured from post-consumer recycled polyester(PET), and is specially created with a focus on reducing the environmental impact both in production and natural resources.

Yoga Journal

Yoga Journal

The Varier Move Fetured in Yoga Journal

Be sure to pick up this month’s issue of Yoga Journal and check out the Move on their “Must List.” We have known for quite sometime how well the Varier products complement a yoga practice. There are very few seating opitions that can extend the principles of core strength and blance outside of the studio like the Move and Variable. It’s exciting to see leaders in the yoga world agree!

Our Active Past vs. Our Passive Present

Our Active Past vs. Our Passive Present

Our Active Past vs. Our Passive Present

It is no secret that we live much different lives today than our ancestors did just a few generations ago. Thanks to our modern amenities like smartphones, automobiles, and computers, much of our day is spent in a seated position, pushing buttons as opposed to moving around.

We recently stumbled on this video which provided a pretty fun visual of exactly this issue. Check it out.

Now get out there and move!

SOAR Moves!

SOAR Moves!

Just outside of Asheville, North Carolina, nestled between the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Nantahala National Forest is the Academy at SOAR. The Academy at SOAR is an academic adventure program and residential boarding school for youth with learning disabilities including but not limited to ADHD, Dyslexia, and Executive Functioning difficulties. SOAR offers an alternative learning environment that combines academics, adventure, and life skills development to help prepare students academically, socially, and emotionally for adulthood.

Recently I visited their campus and their newly redesigned math classroom, complete with standing desks and Varier Moves™.

As I listened to their experiences with the Move, it was easy to understand how active seating can be beneficial at this school, or any other. Instead of spending time and energy focusing on sitting still, students can now rock, pivot, and fidget while being more present in class.

Take a moment and watch the video and hear directly from both administrators and students on how they have finally found something that works for them.

We’ve grown up thinking that education is a time to sit still and learn. Some children are rewarded for sitting quietly at their desks and doing their lessons, while other children who can’t or won’t sit still are seen as unable to cope in a “normal” classroom setting. What if we pause for a minute and rethink our concept of “normal.” Is it normal to have inquisitive, active children sitting still most of the day?

As a kinesiologist, I believe that movement throughout the day should be celebrated and encouraged. It is ironic that we ask our children to sit still and stop fidgeting in school even though we now have the research to prove how detrimental it is to our health. Everywhere I look, there is a message that static sitting is inferior. There is even a grave slogan that caught media attention that says “sitting is the new smoking.” But yet we still seem comfortable with allowing, and in many cases forcing our kids to sit still for a large portion of their day.

Our children seem to innately know the benefits of movement, so I encourage parents, teachers, and administrators to celebrate their true nature and give kids the tools for being the best version of themselves.

About the Author
Stevyn Guinnip has a masters degree in kinesiology and is a veteran in the fitness industry. She has a wide range of experience including NIH research, personal training, corporate wellness, cardiac rehab, group fitness, and launching fitness programs in both the US and Australia. Stevyn believes that if you seek wellness, you will find freedom. She also believes in the importance of the integrated core muscles including the (often neglected) pelvic floor muscles and diaphragm which are impacted by good posture, breathing, and movement.

Sit or Stand? Why sitting may still be best

Sit or Stand? Why sitting may still be best

By now you’ve probably heard that too much sitting isn’t good for you.

Right or wrong, we still find ourselves sitting the majority of our day. Because of this, I’ve seen a significant increase in the push to get employees out of their chairs and onto their feet. While I applaud the concept, I’m not convinced that standing is the answer. Consider the following risks of standing, and then ask yourself…does the risk of occupational sitting really outweigh the risk of standing?

  1. Stroke or Heart Attack. In the case of a sudden stroke or heart attack at work, sitting at your desk means you are closer to the ground. Therefore, you won’t bump your head as hard when you go unconscious.
  2. Fire. You will be two steps ahead of your coworkers. Remember that smoke rises, so it’s safer to be closer to the ground. Skip the first two steps (stop and drop), and just roll right out of your chair for a better chance of survival.
  3. Brain Function. The air is thinner at altitude, so working from your chair will make it easier to breathe and supply your brain with more oxygen, hence making you smarter than your standing coworkers.
  4. Time Management. Sitting at your desk is a time-management strategy that should be praised. Not only are you getting your work done, but you are also in training for your next binge-watching marathon on Netflix. You are basically getting paid to practice sitting through 6 episodes of ‘The Crown.’
  5. Money. You will burn fewer calories sitting all day. This means you won’t have to buy as much food and can save money on your grocery bill.
  6. The Planet. Since you won’t be on your feet all day, your shoes don’t wear out as fast. This means you won’t have to throw your worn out shoes in landfills. Mother Nature will thank you if you simply stay seated.

“sitting more and moving less at your desk has significant benefits”…said no kinesiologist ever.

In all seriousness, the answer isn’t just sitting or just standing. The answer is movement. Move through different positions and try not to stay in the same position for too long. Even transitioning just 2 hours of your workday into other positions can have a significant positive impact on weight, chronic disease, and morbidity.

About the Author
Stevyn Guinnip has a masters degree in kinesiology and is a veteran in the fitness industry. She has a wide range of experience including NIH research, personal training, corporate wellness, cardiac rehab, group fitness, and launching fitness programs in both the US and Australia. Stevyn believes that if you seek wellness, you will find freedom. She also believes in the importance of the integrated core muscles including the (often neglected) pelvic floor muscles and diaphragm which are impacted by good posture, breathing, and movement.