When a few of our chairs popped up in the trendy New York-based architecture and design magazine PIN-UP, we wanted to highlight some of our chairs by Norwegian designer Peter Opsvik.

The designs by Peter Opsvik have challenged the idea of sitting since the 1970s. His chairs incorporate the idea of giving the human body the freedom to move instead of conventional products that force a certain position and posture onto its user. Following his principle, “the next position is always the best,” Opsvik created a variety of chairs that follow the body’s natural movement and encourage a healthy relationship with the chair.

We are proud to call some of Peter’s designs our own and highlight some of our favorites available in the Varier collection.

Variable Balans (1979)

Variable’s unique design and functionality make it an instantly recognizable icon. Throughout its 40 years of history, the gentle tilting motion and open-angle sitting posture have remained constant. The sophisticated kneeling design provides optimal comfort while gently switching between kneeling and the more traditional posture. The Variable fits in nicely with all interiors, especially accompanied by a desk.

Gravity (1983)

Experience ultimate relaxation and weightlessness with the Gravity kneeling rocker chair. The design classic supports your back and neck while continuously promoting flow and movement in countless positions. Fully reclined, the Gravity elevates your legs above your heart, and rocks gently to the rhythm of your breathing. Leaning forward, it can be used as a kneeling chair. This unique combination makes it the ideal chair for the contemporary home and work environment.

Actulum (1995)

The pendulum movement of the Actulum rocking chair makes it an all-rounder chair for work, dining, and leisure. Inspired by the comfort of recliners, the designer created a chair for any table or desk that provides optimal flow and relaxation. The wooden runners follow your body’s natural movements, while the flexible joint of the backrest lets you lean backward effortlessly. This subtle activity strengthens core muscles and prevents tension in the neck and shoulders.